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Froskurinn

Froskurinn on LPL’s unique Worlds alliance: "This bootcamp in Wuhan, where other LPL pros are assisting the LPL teams, is a byproduct of what started in Rift Rivals."

By Mark Register
Sep 19, 2017
Froskurinn schools us on the LPL's anti-meta, fearless playstyle.

What does LPL do that other regions should do?

Conform to their identity. I think so many regions are chasing the Korean dream or the Korean playstyle or trying to find that perfect way of playing League of Legends. And I know that I just gave this big long speech about how casting from our perspective I'm always looking for you know the play should have been this. And because they didn't do that, this is where their mistakes were and this is what that means.

But what the LPL does so wonderfully is -- especially in our three teams that we're sending in WE, EDG, and RNG -- is that each of them have this very clear flaw. And it makes this really beautiful rock paper scissors. And the fact that the LPL doesn't care about the Korean meta. They won't try to follow it. They went into Rift Rivals. They continued to blind pick their Kog'Maws. They lost... Like Team WE, they ran a composition, blind picked the Kog'Maw, lost to SKT, and then locked in the exact same composition and beat SKT the next game. And it's that confidence of saying it's not you, it's just on us. We don't care what you do. We only want to focus on what we're doing. We know what our identity is, we know how we like to play League of Legends, and that's how we're going to do it.

So speaking of the three teams going to Worlds. At Rift Rivals, they ended up competing against or practicing against other LPL team and now you actually have a bunch of players from LPL who didn't make it to Worlds coming to help them practice and bootcamp. So can you give us more insight on that?

So Invictus Gaming I think was the big org that kicked it off. A couple of other professional players I believe Eimy and PYL from LGD are going to be attending. I think some of the iMAY guys but effectively a lot of the kind of brains or superstars of the region, a lot of shot callers, a lot of captains, are going to Wuhan to help run a boot camp so at Rift Rivals, the LPL teams went and they didn't talk to each other. They weren't going to assist each other. They're all going to be competing you know it's a very tough, very tight race in the LPL, and they were still looking at Worlds. Yes they wanted to win Rift Rivals. It was a very big deal for the LPL because they wanted that redemption story. But the first couple of days coaches didn't talk to each other at all. You are the enemy. You're the enemy. And then LMS and LCK, you're also the enemy. But as they started to lose and as they started to slip back that's when the coaches changed gears, and they started to build relationships and work together.

That's when all of the famous pictures of all of the LPL coaches stand together in the parking lot, staying out too like 4 a.m. to help trade draft secrets and things like that and really prepping. And I know that the Rift Rivals format gets a lot of lash back and I know that it's not the same extent as winning a best of five against a single team or MSI or Worlds or anything like that. But I think it is very unfair to entirely discredit the growth and the relationships that Rift Rivals really created for the LPL. A lot of the coaches have said in interviews that the relationships built there have now led to the relationships that are being built and the preparation that is being set up for Worlds. You know this boot camp in Wuhan where other LPL pros are assisting the LPL teams is a byproduct of what started in Rift Rivals.

How would you describe N.A. from across the world?

I'll speak to the Cloud9 versus CLG game. The first thing that I noticed is the the indecision on windows about when to fight. So one of those games I believe Cloud9 had impact on like Maokai or something like that. And there was this constant Baron dance and the set up and mid game is just I think it’s probably the most important part of League of Legends. You know how you place your vision, when you're placing the vision, how you're making the set up, and what pressure points you're moving around. And there's just like Cloud9 needs to fight, Cloud9 still need to fight, they need to fight right now. They need to go right this second because CLG are not in position. And if I'm watching the LPL when I say that the LPL teams will immediately flash forward and start fighting, but Cloud9 it's kind of like are we going to fight, we're not going to fight, or are we gonna do it?

And then Righteous Glory flies in and you know Impact finds a man on the Maokai. But because of this wonky indecision where it seems so small--it might be like a 5 second to a 15 second window. In comparison to my domestic region, if you're against China, you're gonna get blown the fuck up. They will not tolerate you not knowing what you need to do for five seconds. If they see you, they're immediately going to jump on you. And that then requires the NA teams to have that miracle mode which Sneaky brought it out in that series. Like his Xayah performance, him flashing forward, him trying to find the big plays. He needed to do that because his team wasn't on the ball and trying to find those perfect set ups and engagements. So right now my initial observation in terms of like in North America versus LPL and you really need to tighten up that team fighting.

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Froskurinn
Interview
LPL
Mark Register profile
Mark Register
Mark is the Editor-in-Chief @ Blitz Esports. He was the creator of Esports in a Nutshell, led production @ the Young Turks for 5 years, and in his other lifetimes won an Oscar, recorded albums (on Spotify), and most importantly spent a summer as a SeaWorld performer.
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